Notables I-L

Impett, Walter
Jones, William Michael Angelo
King, Edwin James
King, Edwin James Jnr
King, Francis Arthur
Klippel, Alec
Lee, William James
Leech, Frederick
Lelievre-Lee, Amelia Winifred
Leward, Frank
Lillicrap, Douglas Vernon
Lillicrap, Francis James
Lilly, Arthur
Lockyer, Francis Henry (Frank)
Lund, Hermann Maier

Impett, Walter

Music teacher, organist, pianist, music critic and composer
Born: 1868, England
Died: 1952, Auckland

Impett came to New Zealand as a child and worked in New Zealand his entire life, primarily in Auckland but also for almost 10 years in Whanganui where he was party to the establishment of the Wanganui Liedertafel choir.

Impett returned to Auckland taking up in 1904 the position of organist and choirmaster at St James Presbyterian Church, a role he was to retain until 1945. Of his compositions his piano piece, The Chimes was produced in 4 different editions and his Echos de nuit, and Amber glows received considerable contemporary popularity. A number of his pieces were of topical interest, such as his Red Cross Nurse, written to raise funds for the Red Cross service during World War 1.

Along with his teaching and church musician duties, Impett acted as a music critic for the New Zealand Herald and presented lectures on musical subjects both in person and on the radio.

Compositions:
The Chimes. (Auckland: New Zealand Graphic, 1894) and 3 later editions
Echos de nuit. (Auckland: Wright, 1894) and 1911 Eady edition
New Zealand’s dark men. (Wellington: McKee and Gamble, 1896?)
Marche de Palatine. (Auckland: A. Eady, 1897)
Two sapphires. (Dunedin: Triad, 1899)
Motherland. (Auckland: A. Eady, 1900)
Night patrol. (Auckland: A. Eady, 1901)
Christmas carol. (Wellington: New Zealand Times, 1903)
In the cloisters. (Dunedin: Triad, 1903)
Song of the scout. (Sydney: Alberts, 1911)
That golden day. (Auckland: A. Eady, 1912)
Amber glow. (Auckland: 1913)
Red cross nurse. (Auckland: Wilson and Horton, 1918)

Resources
Nichol, E. Dedicated to the colonial music-loving public. p.74-77. DOI https://researchspace.auckland.ac.nz/handle/2292/35499
EN

*******************

Jones, William Michael Angelo

Kindly supplied by C. Rice

Piano tuner. organist, music teacher, composer
Born: 1855, Wales
Died: 1938, Wales
Active in New Zealand: 1877?-1904

Jones acted as a piano tuner and agent for Begg’s and lived in Dunedin and Oamaru. After his divorce in 1886 he moved and finally settled in Greymouth where he continued his business as a piano tuner and repairer as well as being organist for the Methodist Church. He was also an agent for pianos sold through the DIC company. In 1904 he left for a position in Johannesburg, where his death was reported the following year.However, he appears to have returned to Wales and lived for over another 30 years.

Compositions
Wreck of the Tararua: cantata. (Unpublished, 1885)
Zealandia waltz. (Dunedin: Kelsey, 1879
Dunedin chimes waltz. (Dunedin: 1882)
Otago Daily Times mazurka. (Dunedin: Kelsey, 1882)

Resources
Templeton, C. T. ‘A poem with a tale’, New Zealand Organ News, vol. 51, no. 1, pp.41-3.
EN

***********************

King, Edwin James

Music retailer, music teacher, piano tuner
Born: 1842, London
Died: 1903, Wellington
Active in New Zealand: 1862-1901

After moving to Melbourne from London with his parents, Edwin King then went to Dunedin in 1860. In 1862 he set up a bookselling business which he sold to Joseph Braithwaite before heading to Hokitika. After a time there he joined Madame Cora’s Concert Company as a pianist and toured New Zealand. In 1868 he moved to Whanganui where he taught music and established a music business and was bandmaster of the Wanganui Rifles and Wanganui Garrison Bands. He sold his Whanganui business to Herbert and Henry Collier in 1879 and returned to music teaching . In 1886 he he settled in Wellington where he established another music business, the Te Aro Music Warehouse. He was also bandmaster of the Wellington City Brass Band and conductor of the Working Men’s Club orchestra. His eldest son, Edwin Jnr was later involved in the business.

Photo source
Cyclopedia of New Zealand: Wellington area, 1896, p. 451.
CG

********************

King, Edwin James Jnr (Ted)

Music retailer, pianist, teacher, piano tuner, composer
Born: 1866, New Zealand
Died: April 1937, New Zealand

Worked with his father, Edwin James King, in the music business E. J. King & Son, also known as the Te Aro Music Warehouse, from 1888. His brother was the violinist, Francis King and his cousin the conductor and musical director, Francis Crowther. He was the leader of a swing band and also involved in brass bands.

Compositions
Glasgow D’Alberts. (Wellington: Te Aro Music Warehouse, 1896)
CG

********************

King, Francis Arthur

Violinist, composer
Born: 1873, New Zealand
Died: Unknown
Active in New Zealand: Unknown

Son of Edwin James King , brother of Edwin James King Jnr and cousin of conductor and musical director Francis Crowther. He was a pupil of Herbert Collier and Tallis Trimnell and also studied at the Royal Academy of Music, London. At the time of his father’s death in 1903 he was a player in the Empire Orchestra, London where he settled.

His composition Huia Schottische was published by his family’s music business, the Te Aro Music Warehouse.

Compositions
Huia Schottische. (Wellington: Te Aro Music Warehouse, 1891)
CG

********************

Klippel, Alec

Music retailer
Born: 28 August 1887, Austria
Died: Australia
Active in New Zealand: 1912-1914

Alec Klippel left Galicia, which was then part of Austria, when he was fourteen and went first to England and then to Sydney where his uncle had a music business selling non-copyright music. Klippel obtained a supply of sheet music from him and sold it to shops in country areas. Later he worked as a traveller for Hawkes’ brass instruments in New South Wales. In 1912, with a supply of sheet music from his uncle, he left for Wellington where he set up The Anglo-American Music Stores in Cuba Street selling sheet music with a girl employed to “play it over”. Branches were soon established in Christchurch and Auckland. In 1914 Klippel sold half the business to J. W. Bell and Matthew Guthrie and went to Tasmania where he opened a similar business, only returning to New Zealand to receive the final payment for the New Zealand shops.

Other resources
Ann Gluckman (ed). “From Galica to Australia and New Zealand: Alec Kippel’s Story.” Australian Jewish Historical Society Journal, Vol XIX, Part 1, pp. 75-85.
CG

********************

Lee, William James

Otago Daily Tines, 30 November, 1895

Violin maker, music teacher
Born: 1857?, Queensland, Australia
Died: 1936, Dunedin
Active in New Zealand: 1860s? – 1936

William Lee started out as a cabinet maker and undertaker in Dunedin, following in the tradition of his father. However, ill-health forced a change in profession and he developed the skills to establish himself as a violin maker using New Zealand woods. Some of Lee’s instruments included a carved Maori head on the tailpiece. One instrument was reputedly sent for inclusion in the permanent exhibition at the Imperial Institute, although no trace of it can now be found in the records.
EN

*********************

Leech, Frederick

Viola, violin and double bass teacher, conductor, composer
Born: c1830, Manchester, England
Died: 1912, Dunedin
Active in New Zealand: 1866-1912

Born in England Frederick Leech emigrated to Victoria in 1858 then moved to Hokitika in 1866. In 1873 he went to Dunedin with Cagli and Lyster’s Italian Operatic Company where he took up teaching. He later secured a position as Musical Director of the Princess Theatre. An orchestra formed by Leech was the precursor to the Dunedin Orchestral Society.

Compositions
In the south there springs a fountain. (Unknown)
All hail Zealandia. (Dunedin: Charles Begg & Co, 1874)
Don’t hit man when down. (Dunedin: Corrigan, 1896)
Grand old flag. (Dunedin: Charles Begg & Co, 1900)
All hail Zealandia and God save the King. (Dunedin: Charles Begg & Co, 1902; Dunedin: Dresden, 1902)
CG

********************

Lelievre-Lee, Amelia Winifred

Sunrise. Waltz

Music teacher, pianist, violinist and composer
Born: 1872, Hastings
Died: 1957, Hastings

Amelia ( Milly) Lelievre-Lee (nee Lee) was born and educated in Hastings. After a period living in Auckland she returned to Hastings after the death of her husband in 1911 and continued her career as a music teacher, violinist and pianist.

She was very involved with her local Catholic parish and wrote a number of sacred works as well as some piano pieces. She also regularly lead the Hastings Orchestral Society orchestra. Her song New Zealand cradle song, although unpublished, was highly commended in the 1936 Wellington branch of the British Music Society’s competition for New Zealand composers.

Published compositions:
Tantum ergo for soprano solo. (1909)
Sunrise. Waltz. (Auckland: A. Eady, 1910)
Nighfall. Waltz. (Auckland: A.Eady, 1912)

Resources:
Alexander Turnbull Library. Lelievre-Lee, Amelia Winifred, 1872-1957 : Music scores. MS-Group-0636
EN

********************

Leward, Frank, see McGlashan, John

**********************

Lillicrap, Douglas Vernon

Singer, music retailer
Born: 1878, Invercargill
Died: 1944, New Zealand

Douglas Lillicrap was the younger brother of Frank Lillicrap, He trained as a cabinet maker and was a well known local tenor. Around 1905 he moved to Wellington where he was manager of the Wellington Piano Company. He subsequently worked for the DIC in their piano department and then managed the Anglo-American Music Stores, firstly in Wellington and then in Auckland. In 1922 he opened his own business in Queen Street, Auckland, Lillicrap’s Music Store Ltd, which closed in 1927.
CG

*******************

Lillicrap, Francis James (Frank)

Clarinetist, music retailer
Born: 1864, Wellington
Died: 1922, Invercargill

Frank Lillicrap was the older brother of Douglas Lillicrap. In 1893 he bought the Southland Music Depot, previously owned by A F Lithgow, and renamed it Lillicrap & Co. The business also sold books, stationery and fancy goods. In 1904 it became Lillicrap, McNaughton and Co but the partnership was dissolved in 1911 and the business reverted to its earlier name. In 1916 Frank Lillicrap resigned his agency association with the Bristol (formerly the Dresden), in which capacity he had promoted and sold their pianos and other musical goods for over 22 years. He stood for mayor in 1921.
CG

********************

Lilly, Arthur

Music teacher, organist, composer
Born: 1882, Christchurch
Died: 1960, Christchurch

Arthur Lilly followed his elder brother Alfred into a career as an organist. Leaving New Zealand at the age of 21 to study at the Royal College of Organists’ he returned to take up the first of several positions in as organist and choirmaster in Christchurch.

Lilly continued to explore his own compositional ideas, most significantly in his work Life (which was written to honour the military service of his brother Leslie), first performed in 1916 and then again in 1930. Lilly had also been at the fore in organising the two Christchurch Festivals of New Zealand Music held in 1916 and 1918.

Resources:
Szczepanski, Joanna Z. and Yapp, Francis. “Music in honour of a First World War soldier: Life by Arthur Lilly”. Records of the Canterbury Museum, 2017 Vol. 31: p. 127–138.

A photo of Lilly is available on the Canterbury Museum blog site.
EN

**********************

Lockyer, Francis Henry (Frank)

Frank Lockyer

Singer, music retailer, piano tuner
Born: 1867, 16 June, Adelaide, Australia
Died: 1937, 8 May, Napier
Active in New Zealand: 1896-1933

Frank Lockyer came to Dunedin in 1896 and joined Charles Begg & Co where he worked for five years. During this time he married Charles Begg’s niece, Helen Begg. In 1901 they moved to Napier where Frank established a piano and general music dealership with premises at the corner of Browning and Hastings Streets, operating as agent for Begg’s for some years. Also a singer, while in Dunedin he passed the Royal Academy of Music’s highest test in voice in 1900 and in Napier was Secretary and Treasurer of the Napier Orchestral Society. Lockyers’ premises were destroyed in the 1931 Napier earthquake, but subsequently rebuilt. The business continued to be an important part of Napier’s musical and commercial life until 1959 when it was sold to Begg’s and became their Napier branch.

Other resources:
Cyclopedia of New Zealand : Taranaki, Hawke’s Bay and Wellington Provincial Districts, 1908, p.359 (photo source).
“Lockyer’s: world famous in Turangi.” Wares New Zealand, June 2010.
CG

********************

Lund, Hermann Maier

Music teacher, music critic, pianist
Born: 1848, Ulm, Germany
Died: 1932, Christchurch
Active in New Zealand: 1877- 1932

Lund was a pianist, music teacher and newspaper music critic in Christchurch. He studied music under Claus Tausig in Berlin and continued to perform into his 80s. According to his obituary in the Press he also studied under Clara Schumann and was known to Brahms, von Bulow and Wagner. He held the position as music critic for the Press from 1903 for more than 25 years, using the non-de-plume Strad and also wrote articles on a variety of musical subjects.

Lund was also the first President of the Canterbury Society of Professional Musicians, and his pupils included Ernest Empson and Alfred Merton. In a tribute after Lund’s death, Empson wrote “Studying with Mr. Lund meant not only the disciplining of hand, eye and ear in the art of pianism, but a wonderful revelation of music’s power”.

Resources:
Cyclopedia of New Zealand : Canterbury Ptovincial District, 1903, p. 96 & 231. (photo source)
Hermann Meir Lund: family and friends
“Obituary. Mr H. M. Lund.” The Press, 7 March, 1932
EN

********************